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27

Asian Studies: Japanese Americans

Final Accountability: Rosters of Evacuees

at Japanese-American Relocation Centers,

1944-1946

Source

National Archives (U.S.)

Period

1944-1946

Content

3,145 images

Product Number

265121

Product Code

GDSC-71

The rosters, which are part of the Records of the War Relocation Authority, consist of

alphabetical lists of evacuees resident at the centers during the period of their existence. The

lists typically provide the following information about the individual evacuees: name, family

number, sex, date of birth, marital status, citizenship status, alien registration number, method

of original entry into center, date of entry, pre-evacuation address, center address, type of

final departure, date of departure, and final destination. Included for each center are summary

tabulations on evacuees resident at the center and on total admissions and departures.

Japanese American Internment: Records

of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library

Source

Franklin D. Roosevelt Library

Period

1933-1988

Content

6,734 images

Product Number

16381545

Product Code

GDSC-279

In an atmosphere of hysteria following U.S. entry into the Second World War, and with the

support of officials at all levels of the federal government, President Franklin D. Roosevelt

authorized the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and

resident aliens from Japan. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, dated February 19, 1942, gave

the U.S. military broad powers to ban any citizen froma wide coastal area stretching from the

state of Washington to California and extending inland into southern Arizona. The order also

authorized transporting these citizens to assembly centers hastily set up and governed by the

military in Arizona, California, Oregon, and Washington. The same executive order, as well as

other war-time orders and restrictions, were also applied to smaller numbers of residents of

the United States of Italian or German descent. Yet while these individuals (and others from

those groups) suffered grievous violations of their civil liberties, the war-time measures

applied to Japanese Americans were harsher and more sweeping. Entire communities were

uprooted by an executive order that targeted U.S. citizens and resident aliens.

Original Microform Title: The Internment of Japanese Americans: Records of the Franklin D. Roosevelt

Library